Techinical Report

CNPq Research Group “Art, Culture and Power

Proposed goals:

The purpose of this research group is to analyze power relations inherent to the constitution of various contemporary cultural circles, particularly those of capoeira, graffiti, memory and heritage preservation, and literature. These power relations are assessed from an interdisciplinary approach, capable of simultaneously considering both national and international issues. Our work is focused on three central themes: the analysis of the historical and political constitution of the national social imaginary; the analysis of cultural practices and tensions shaped by public policies and market forces; and the comparative analysis of literary discourses from various countries.

Outcomes:

This results of this research group can be measured in terms of: individual publications; the organization of two seminars, one in 2010 and one in 2013; the publication of books; the participation of group members in meetings, seminars and congresses; the coordination of the “Memory and Society” WG [GT “Memória e Sociedade”] at the XV Brazilian Sociological Society meeting that took place in Curitiba between July 26 and 29; and the coordination of the “Heritages: Between the material, the natural and the intangible” WG [GT “Patrimônios: Entre o material, o natural e o intangível”] for the XI Luso-Afro-Brazilian Social Sciences Congress/CONLAB conducted at the Federal University of Bahia (UFBA) between August 7 and 10.

Project development:

The Art, Culture and Power research group intends to analyze power relations inherent to cultural practices. Power has been gauged based on disputes involving various stakeholders in traditional political forums. Considerable attention has been given to symbolic meanings that can interfere with the distribution of resources and the hierarchy of social groups. The great majority of the studies on cultural practices are based on universalistic narratives that analyze cultural policies, regardless of the meaning inherent to the specific narratives involved. The fact that the heterogeneous nature of these practices is not addressed may indicate a partiality to a given social imaginary over many others. Debates have moved towards a better definition of the constituted social imaginaries, which has been achieved through the historical establishment of cultural practices – some of which are originated from the colonization process, others from the constitution of the national States, and others still from production and commercial circles established by a growing process of market globalization.

In Brazil, the questioning of power relations – as presented by narratives of numerous institutions throughout the country – has only started recently. We no longer consider cultural narratives as likely to be neutral. The studies developed here show that power relations are not associated only with class struggles or disputes over wealth distribution. The fight for acknowledgement has become part of the agenda of new social movements.

Liberal governments from the 1980s and 1990s tended to prioritize the market with only small interventions in the cultural sphere. Some investment was made in historical cities in an attempt to include them in UNESCO lists and promote international tourism, and Federal Decree-Law 3551 of 2000 created the intangible cultural heritage list in Brazil. In spite of the potential inherent to both actions, the country’s “national-popular” design that was shaped during the Vargas Era remained unchanged. An official break from the national-popular discourse only commenced in 2003 when the government resumed their interventionist practice in the cultural sector, switching from their former focus on a unified nation to the promotion of diversity. In addition to the creation of special departments for African descendants, women and youths, new policies were also established to promote diversity, reinforcing concepts the UN was already fostering internationally in the 1980s. Since then the Brazilian Ministry of Culture has shifted their position, now viewing culture as an instrument for social inclusion.

In short, we can say that universalistic narratives are still predominant in the analyses of artistic and cultural production. The fact that the heterogeneous nature of these practices is not addressed may signal the preference for a given social imaginary over many others. The Art, Culture and Power research group values and advances studies on many established social imaginaries. This is done through historical analyses of cultural practices – some of which originated from the colonizing process, others from the constitution of the national States, and others still from production and commercial circuits established by a growing process of market globalization.

Support and scholarships:

MCT/CNPq 02/2009 Edict – Human, Social and Applied Social Sciences

Coordinator: Myrian Sepúlveda dos Santos

Team: Professor Carmem Lúcia Negreiros de Figueiredo, PhD; Professor Geraldo Pontes Jr, PhD; Professor Simone Vassalo, PhD; Professor Ronaldo Oliveira de Castro, PhD; Professor Tereza Ventura, PhD; Professor Victor Hugo Adler Pereira, PhD

FAPERJ APQ2/2010 Support – Support for the Organization of Events

Coordinator: Myrian Sepúlveda dos Santos

CNPq/2010 Support – Support for the Organization of Events

Coordinator: Myrian Sepúlveda dos Santos

FAPERJ APQ3/2011 Support – Support for the Publication of Books

Coordinator: Geraldo Pontes Jr

FAPERJ 15/2011 Edict – Humanities

Coordinator: Myrian Sepúlveda dos Santos

Team: Professor Carmem Lúcia Negreiros de Figueiredo, PhD; Professor Geraldo Pontes Jr, PhD; Professor Maurício Barros de Castro, PhD; Professor Tereza Ventura, PhD

CAPES/PAEP/2013 Edict – Support for the Organization of Events

Coordinator: Myrian Sepúlveda dos Santos

FAPERJ APQ2/2013 Support – Support for the Organization of Events

 

Coordinator: Myrian Sepúlveda dos Santos

Copyright © 2017 Arte, Cultura e Poder

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